I am delighted by this New York Times article about a family who pooled their resources to save their old dog’s life:
 
“We were as high at the sight of our dog, tail wagging and on his feet again, as Max was on the methadone they had given him for post-op pain. A mere six grand for bringing our guy back from death’s door? A bargain!”

Lounging

 
Ace had the slow weekend we are coming to expect as she heals from her surgery. We started off Saturday with a trip to the vet to teach Jefe and me how to inject her with Adequan. It is not a necessary component of her recovery, but I already decided that anything the vet recommends I will try. If you know me, you know I’m a bit squeamish about needles. If you don’t know me, but now you know I don’t like needles, just imagine how much I must love my dog if I’m willing to inject her! Ace was a gracious pin cushion and allowed me to practice on her with the vet tech’s guidance. We’ll get to have that exciting experience seven more times over the next month in the comfort of our own home, with possible maintenance doses in our future. Goody.
 
Now that Ace has graduated to 10-minute daily walks, but is so bored she wants to run a marathon every time we open the front door, I decided to use this weird situation to try to teach her to walk loosely on a leash. Leash walking skills were not our strong suite in puppy class, mostly because Ace is so excited to be outside and I have the misguided notion that she should be allowed to direct our movements during walks because the walks are “for her.” After watching a few low tech YouTube videos and initiating a few false starts, we managed to do a bit of training by pacing around the sidewalk in front of our apartment.
 
Now that we live in a fancier part of town, instead of drunk homeless guys harassing us during training, we have well-meaning, well-groomed ladies and gentlemen stopping our frantic efforts to coo over “the puppy.” Ace does a very good job at pretending to be a puppy learning to walk for the first time, until my neighbors invariably notice the odd shaven parts of her and nervously hurry off. We’ll see if I have the stamina to hold good boundaries so something can come of this strange time.
 
Otherwise, Ace was pretty much just lounging, as depicted in this collage of various stages of repose. The tongue lolling out of her flat face is my favorite, and we’ve gotten to see more of it recently due to the tranquilizer. Also, there is lip smacking, sleep suckling, and violent trembling. At least she’s running up those sand dunes in her dreams.